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Dealing with the Digital Television Transition

by Quintana Woodridge 

“I don’t have a TV. I use my internet to get information on what’s going on around the world. My cable bill is $50 a month with taxes. It was recently disconnected due to prorated expenses that were too much,” said Ebone Young.

Young is a resident of the South Shore community on the Southeast side of Chicago. She is one among millions of low-income citizens not only in Chicago but across the United States that do not have access to television programming due to the Digital TV conversion.

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Are Illinois’ Drug Laws Racially Biased?

by Mary C. Piemonte 

State Commissioner Marian Perkins discusses proposed changes to current drug laws while state Rep. Art Turner (D-Chicago) and Sen. Mattie Hunter (D-Chicago) look on. Photo by MARY C. JOHNS

Why are African Americans in Illinois nine times more likely to be incarcerated than whites?

A new state commission is trying to find the answers to this question and devise some solutions.

The Illinois Disproportionate Justice Impact Study Commission held the first of several public hearings in February in response to a 2007 Sentencing Project study showing Illinois was the 14th worst state in the nation when it came to the odds of African Americans going to prison.

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An Addiction to Self-Discovery

by Mia Dunlap 

Greetings everyone, my name is Mia Dunlap and I am addicted to self-discovery and to the quality welfare of under-represented youth.

I have grappled with this addiction for a number of years before acknowledging it.

In August 2006, when I made up my mind to attend Spelman College, I confirmed my addiction to self discovery.

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Bronzeville Memorialized

by Jacqueline Thompson 

In the fall of 2009, two marble obelisks were placed at 35th and South State streets to commemorate the African American migrants who gave an identity to Bronzeville and attract tourists to the area.

The obelisks will give people information concerning the rich heritage of the Black Americans who migrated to Chicago from the South in 1900 and the following years.

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Faith Leaders Call for School Reform

by Gail Dameron 

Legislators and faith leaders gathered last year to push for a change in the way the State of Illinois funds schools.

“Our children deserve us to fight in the streets for justice,” said Rep. David E. Miller (D-Chicago). Miller recently received the Democratic nomination to run for state Comptroller.

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Urban League Sues for School Equity

by Quintana Woodridge 

Black and Latino students are more likely to attend an under-funded school than whites because of the ways schools in Illinois are funded, according to a lawsuit filed by the Chicago Urban League against the State of Illinois.

The Urban League originally filed suit in August 2008, asserting that the State of Illinois is violating the Illinois Civil Rights Act by discriminating against families based on race and has deprived African American, Latino and other minority children of a high quality education.

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Budget Woes Nationwide

by Michael Ibrahem 

The budget woes for the state of Illinois have dragged on for many months. The Civic Federation in Chicago recently published a report which called for Illinois state government to reduce pension benefits, cut $2.5 billion from the budget, and increase taxes.

But what do the people think?

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US Reps Issue New Call to Stop Demolitions

by Mary C. Piemonte 

US Representatives Maxine Waters (D-CA) and Barney Frank (D-Mass.) recently issued a new call to stop demolition of public housing.

Waters and Frank initially sent a letter to the US Department of Housing and Urban Development calling for the moratorium on demolition in fall 2008.

They sent a new letter to President Barack Obama’s HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan on June 15 last year.

The two congressional leaders urged Donovan to consider imposing a 1-year moratorium on demolition of public housing units because of the national housing crisis.

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Stepping Up

by Elizabeth Jordan ,Youth Reporter from Ujima

Editor’s Note: The following article was written by a youth reporter who is a graduate of the Urban Youth International Journalism Program.

Why is it that not even two generations have passed since the civil rights movement and African Americans, as a race, have settled for just enough to get by?

Martin Luther King Jr. fought for equal rights for Blacks to simply be able to use the same bathroom as whites, use the same entrances as whites, and for equal education.

Rosa Parks fought for us to be able to sit where we want on the bus.

Generations before us fought for equal living and now that they helped get those rights for us, we have now settled.

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Putting Animal Cruelty In Perspective

by Jasmine Hunt , Youth Reporter from Ujima

Editor’s Note: The following article was written by a youth reporter who is a graduate of the Urban Youth International Journalism Program.

A responsible pet owner is someone who provides food, water and shelter for their pet. This combined with attention, love and care can create a positive environment for years of long lasting companionship.

Unfortunately, some animals never get a chance to experience this situation.

Various types of animal cruelty can destroy and prevent some pets and animals from having a healthy and fulfilling life.

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